Association Says Proposed Rule Hurts Residents

Officials with a Florida nursing home association recently filed a legal challenge to a proposed rule that they say would financially burden assisted living operators in the state and have a negative impact on elderly residents and their families. They also claim that the bill doesn’t recognize differences between assisted living and skilled nursing.

The litigation stems from House Bill 1001, which is known as the “Assisted Living Reform Bill.” The Florida bill was passed two years ago but is now undergoing rule making before some of its provisions become effective.

 

Florida Near the Top in Country for Number of Assisted Living Communities

The nursing home association, Florida Argentum, is the Florida chapter of the national organization, which previously was known as the Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA).

Florida Argentum represents companies that operate professionally managed senior living communities, such as independent, assisted, and memory care, along with industry partners that serve senior living operators in Florida. Members of the group include the largest assisted living providers in the state.

Argentum says that the legislation and the rules promulgated pursuant to it are critical because Florida has one of the highest numbers of assisted living communities in the country. Argentum believes that the state’s interpretation of its own authority is inaccurate; limiting the power of state agencies to create policies that are deemed not to be supported by statute.

 

Rule Would Institute Difficult Requirements

Florida Argentum claims that the rule proposed by the state Department of Elder Affairs would prevent seniors from aging in place if they have certain medical conditions. The new rule would create requirements that most assisted living communities wouldn’t be able to meet.

For example, a senior resident who’d been treated in the hospital for a urinary tract infection and required IV therapy with antibiotics after she was discharged could receive those services if she were living in a single-family home—however, most assisted living communities in Florida wouldn’t be able to comply with these orders. As a result, the patient wouldn’t be able to receive her services at the assisted living community. The question would then be where she would go to receive the IV treatment. Probably to a rehabilitation center or a skilled nursing facility, Florida Argentum argues, which is excessive for a procedure the elderly woman could normally receive at her home in a care facility.

The organization also said that the proposed rule wants to apply Florida Medicaid requirements to all operators, even for residents not enrolled in Medicaid. That means facilities would be required to assess all incoming residents’ instrumental activities of daily living and develop a care plan at admission.

 

Added Liability Possible

The proposed rule change could also mean increased liability for facilities. The change could lead to increased rates. And assisted living communities could be liable for services provided to residents by third parties.

Challenges of proposed rules like Florida Argentum’s is doing are being presented to an administrative law judge and a hearing is scheduled. The judge then has 30 days to make a decision.

 

Contact Us

If you have questions about the effect of this new rule on a loved one’s residence at a nursing home, Florida Medicaid Attorney John Frazier can help. He’s a skilled Medicaid planning (with over 2,000 cases completed that helped preserve their family’s savings), estate planning and elder law practitioner. Please contact John for a free telephone consultation at 727-586-3306 extension 104. If you prefer click here now to send in a contact form, and we will call you.

 

Florida Official Charged in Medicare/Medicaid Fraud Case

A Florida state healthcare official was charged with accepting bribes in exchange for helping a nursing home owner who’s accused of coordinating a $1 billion Medicare and Medicaid fraud scheme keep his license.

Federal prosecutors in Florida say that Bertha Blanco is facing federal criminal charges in a broad investigation that federal authorities say is the nation’s biggest health fraud case, according to a report in The Miami Herald.

 

Defendant in Charge of Nursing Home Inspections

Blanco was earning about $31,300 a year managing the inspections of Florida nursing homes. She became involved with the inspections at nursing facilities owned by Philip Esformes, who owns dozens of Miami-Dade nursing facilities, along with facilities in Miami, Los Angeles, and Chicago.

Prosecutors said in the criminal complaint filed against Blanco that she took tens of thousands of dollars in cash in exchange for telling Esformes about violations in his homes so he could correct them prior to state inspections. Blanco allegedly took the bribes and provided patient and inspection records to a third-party, who delivered the information to Esformes. With her help, Esformes was able to retain his license and continue to bill the federal government for questionable patient services, the criminal complaint alleged which if accurate is clear Medicare/Medicaid fraud.

Blanco had worked at the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration for nearly 30 years. She is the first of the agency’s employees ever charged with taking bribes, The Miami Herald reported.

 

Trial Set for SNF Owner

Esformes is currently being held in federal custody as a result of the Medicare/Medicaid fraud. He’s scheduled to go to trial in March of next year. Attorneys for Esformes claim that the intermediaries working with Blanco acted without his knowledge. Two of the intermediaries made plea deals and are expected to testify against Esformes. The two assisted investigators in the indictment of Esformes by taping a cash transaction that prosecutors said was earmarked for bribes.

The nursing home owner is accused of using his 20 nursing facilities to file false Medicare and Medicaid claims for services that weren’t necessary for approximately 14,000 patients. Federal prosecutors say that his healthcare network and other co-conspirators billed $1 billion for fraudulent services from 2009 to last year when he was arrested.

 

Contact Us

Florida Medicaid can be a complex subject to tackle. If you have questions about any aspect of Florida Medicaid, Attorney John Frazier is a skilled Medicaid planning (with over 2,000 cases completed that helped preserve their family’s savings), estate planning and elder law practitioner. Please contact John for a free telephone consultation at 727-586-3306 extension 104. If you prefer click here now to send in a contact form, and we will call you.

 

Florida SNFs Suing Managed Care Groups Over Delayed Medicaid Payments

A group of Florida skilled nursing facilities recently filed a class action lawsuit against multiple insurance providers over their delay in Medicaid payments.

The suit was filed in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida. It was initiated by a group of 10 skilled nursing operators against seven managed care companies including affiliates of Humana, Molina Healthcare, and United HealthCare.

 

“Gatekeepers to Medicaid Benefits in Florida”

The lawsuit’s complaint said that the companies were the “gatekeepers to Medicaid benefits in Florida.” The plaintiffs are Skilled Nursing Facilities (“SNFs”) who provide healthcare services to, as the describe in the court document, “some of Florida’s most vulnerable citizens—nearly 71,000 elders and individuals with disabilities—many of whom require 24-hour complex medical care…”

The Skilled Nursing Facilities allege that the Medicaid managed care organizations engaged in a “systematic business practice of illegally withholding interest owed on overdue payments” to the providers, who “rely on the prompt payment of Medicaid funds” to deliver care to the plan’s beneficiaries…the residents of care facilities—primarily Florida’s elderly.

Payments that are delivered after the deadline accrue interest at 12% per year. The plaintiffs claim, “Despite receiving proper claims for payment, Defendants have engaged in a pattern and practice of fabricating reasons to delay payments of claims to Plaintiffs, and then paying an improper amount of interest, if any, on overdue payments.”

The suit also claims the insurance companies made up reasons to reject providers’ proper claims and making them “jump through unnecessary, nonsensical hoops.” This, they said, was a purposeful delay in the payments to increase their revenues.

The providers are asking the District Court for declaratory and monetary relief.

 

Outstanding Claims

The Florida Health Care Association has testified in the Florida State Senate in support for the nursing home providers. They have found that many facilities carry more than $200,000 in outstanding claims. The statewide shortfall is nearly $135 million. Some of this shortfall is Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance), which covers skilled nursing care provided in a skilled nursing facility (SNF) under certain conditions for a limited time.

 

Contact Us

If you have questions about Florida Medicaid, Attorney John Frazier is a skilled Medicaid planning (with over 2,000 cases completed that helped preserve their family’s savings), estate planning and elder law practitioner. Please contact John for a free telephone consultation at 727-586-3306 extension 104. If you prefer click here now to send in a contact form, and we will get in touch with you.

 

 

Medicaid in Skilled Nursing Facilities

Medicaid in skilled nursing facilities is useful to delve into.  A Nursing Facility is one of the settings for care and services provided by Medicaid. The program provides Nursing Facility Services from Medicaid-certified nursing homes. These facilities primarily provide three types of services:

  • Skilled nursing or medical care and related services;
  • Injury, disability, or illness rehabilitation; and
  • Long term care.

The Medicaid-provided long-term care is health-related care and services that are beyond the level of room and board and aren’t available in the community, but needed regularly due to a mental or physical condition.

 

Medicaid in Skilled Nursing Facilities – Getting Deeper

Medicaid coverage of nursing facility services is available only for services provided in a nursing home that’s licensed and certified by the state of Florida as a Medicaid Nursing Facility (NF). Medicaid Nursing Facility Services are available only when other payment options are not available, and the patient is eligible for the Medicaid program.

It’s typically unnecessary for a senior to transfer to another nursing home when the payment source changes to Medicaid NF. Many nursing homes in Florida are also certified as Medicare skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), accepting long term care insurance and private payment.

It’s commonly for a person to enter a Medicare Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) after a hospitalization that qualifies him or her for a limited period of SNF services. If nursing home services are still needed after that period of SNF coverage, the person may pay privately and use their long-term care insurance. If the individual exhausts their assets and is eligible for Medicaid—and the nursing home is also a Medicaid-certified nursing facility—he or she can continue to reside in the nursing home under the Medicaid NF benefit. If the nursing home isn’t Medicaid-certified, the patient would need to transfer to a NF to be covered by the Medicaid Nursing Facility benefit.

 

Medicaid Nursing Facility (NF) Requirements

Federal law states that each Medicaid Nursing Facility must provide and not charge its residents for the following:

  • Nursing and related services;
  • Specialized rehabilitative services (required by those with mental illness or intellectual disability and not provided or arranged for by the state);
  • Medically-related social services;
  • Pharmaceutical services;
  • Individualized resident dietary services;
  • A professionally-directed program of activities that meet the interests and needs of each resident;
  • Emergency dental services;
  • Room and bed maintenance services; and
  • Routine personal hygiene items and services.

On the other hand, Medicaid Nursing Facility residents may be charged for items such as the following:

  • A private room, unless medically needed;
  • Specially prepared food;
  • Telephones, televisions, and radios;
  • Personal comfort items, such as tobacco products and candy;
  • Cosmetic and grooming items and services beyond those of the basic service;
  • Personal clothing;
  • Personal reading materials;
  • Social events and activities beyond the activity program; and
  • Special care services not included in the facility’s Medicaid payment.

 

Contact Us

If you have questions about Florida Medicaid Planning and Medicaid in Skilled Nursing Facilities, Attorney Frazier is a skilled Medicaid planning (with over 2,000 cases completed that helped preserve their family’s savings), estate planning and elder law practitioner. Please contact Attorney Frazier for a free telephone consultation at 727-586-3306 extension 104. If you prefer click here now to send in a contact form and we will call you.

Statewide Medicaid Managed Care Long-Term Care Program

What is Florida’s statewide Medicaid managed care long-term care program? Florida has a program through which Medicaid recipients can access long-term care services. It’s called the Statewide Medicaid Managed Care Long-Term Care Program.

This program has two types of health plans:

  • Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs); and
  • Provider Service Networks (PSNs).

Florida’s Medicaid Long-Term Care Managed Care (LTCMC) plans cover the costs of the assisted living facility and nursing facility care, along with homemaking services, nursing care, and medical equipment for eligible individuals. There are two steps to qualifying for a LTCMC plan:

  • needing a nursing home level of care; and
  • financial eligibility.

 

Nursing Home Level of Care

To qualify for Florida’s LTCMC program, you must require a nursing home level of care. This means that you must be able to prove that your condition is serious to the extent that you either:

  • need to be in a nursing home with available round-the-clock nursing care; or
  • need to be in a nursing home if you weren’t receiving supportive long-term care services.

Florida has a screening program for long-term care applicants. It’s called Comprehensive Assessment and Review for Long-Term Care Services (CARES).

CARES assessments are conducted by the Florida Department of Elder Affairs. In these assessments, applicants are personally interviewed. During that interview, you’ll be asked a variety of questions about your ability to function, the help you need, and your medical conditions. A CARES assessment is required to show that you meet the nursing home level of care necessary to qualify for Florida’s managed long-term care programs.

 

Medical Necessity

Once you’ve shown that you require a nursing home level of care, and you enroll in a managed care plan, the next step is to establish that the service or care you want is medically necessary. Florida managed care plans will only pay for services that are medically necessary. In our state, medically necessary means that the service:

  • is required to protect life, to prevent significant illness or disability, or to alleviate severe pain;
  • is consistent with symptoms of the illness or injury that’s under treatment;
  • is consistent with generally accepted professional medical standards;
  • reflects the level of service that can be safely furnished, and for which no equally effective and more conservative or less costly treatment is available in Florida; and
  • is provided in a way not primarily intended for the convenience of the recipient, the recipient’s caretaker, or the provider.

Your CARES assessment and your treatment providers’ feedback will aid in determining if the particular long-term care service that you want is medically necessary for you.

 

Contact Us

If you have questions about Florida Medicaid, Attorney Frazier is a skilled Medicaid planning (with over 2,000 cases completed that helped preserve their family’s savings), estate planning and elder law practitioner. Please contact Attorney Frazier for a free telephone consultation at 727-586-3306 extension 104. If you prefer click here now to send in a contact form and we will call you.

Florida Medicaid: How Does It Work?

Florida Medicaid is a medical assistance program that provides Florida residents access to health care, typically for low-income families and individuals. In addition, Medicaid also helps Florida’s elderly and people with disabilities with the expense of nursing facility care, as well as other medical and long-term care expenses.

Florida’s Medicaid State Plan is a large, comprehensive written statement describing the scope and nature of the Medicaid program. It details the state’s current Medicaid eligibility standards, policies, and reimbursement system to ensure the state program receives matching federal funds under Title XIX of the Social Security Act. The state covers long term care needs up to 300% SSI.

The Agency for Health Care Administration, the Florida Department of Children and Family, and the Florida Department of Elder Affairs are the government agencies responsible for Medicaid here in Florida.

Florida Medicaid & Statewide Medicaid Managed Care (SMMC) Program
The Agency for Health Care Administration finished its implementation of the Statewide Medicaid Managed Care (SMMC) program in 2014. With the completion of this program, most Medicaid recipients are enrolled in a health plan…the nationally accredited health plans were chosen through a competitive procurement for participation in the program.

The Agency for Health Care Administration is responsible for administering the SMMC program and re-procuring health plans every five years. This program has two parts: the Long-Term Care (LTC) program and the Managed Medical Assistance (MMA) program.

Invitation to Negotiate (ITN)
Florida Medicaid is developing the Invitation to Negotiate (ITN), which is aimed at re-procuring health plans for the SMMC program.

Florida currently has 11 standard capitated plans, five specialty capitated plans, and a specialty plan providing services on a non-risk managed fee-for-service (FFS) basis.

Who’s Enrolled?
Florida residents age 65 and over make up 19% of the state’s population. That’s more than 3.7 million people. In 2014, there were 610,500 seniors participating in Florida Medicare, which was 13% of all the enrollees in the state.

In 2015, Certified Nursing Facility Residents with Medicaid made up over half of those senior participants (57%). The amount spent on these individuals was nearly $55M.

Contact Us
If you have questions about Florida Medicaid, Attorney Frazier is a skilled Medicaid planning (with over 2,000 cases completed that helped preserve their family’s savings), estate planning and elder law practitioner. Please contact Attorney Frazier for a free telephone consultation at 727-586-3306 extension 104. If you prefer click here now to send in a contact form and we will call you.

Medicaid Trusts Are An Option to Get Medicaid Coverage

Medicaid Trusts are an option to consider. With the assistance of an experienced Medicaid attorney, you may be able to preserve some of your estate for your family while satisfying the Medicaid asset limit. In Florida, nursing home residents covered by Medicaid can have only $2,000 in “countable” assets.

When you transfer assets and give them away, you no longer have control. A Medicaid pre-planning gift strategy is to put them in an irrevocable trust. With a trust, an individual or entity (known as the “trustee”) holds legal title to property for the benefit of others, who are called the “beneficiaries.” The trustee is responsible for following the instructions provided in the trust.

The question of whether a trust’s assets are counted against Medicaid’s resource limits is based on the terms of the trust and its creator. Have an experienced Medicaid trust attorney do it legally and correctly.

Revocable Trust

You may have heard of something called a “revocable trust.” For Florida Medicaid planning, this type of Medicaid trust does not work: this trust can be changed or rescinded by the person who created it, and Medicaid considers the principal of these trusts countable in determining program eligibility.

Medicaid Five Year Trusts

An “irrevocable” trust can’t be changed once it’s been created. A Medicaid trust attorney will draft this trust so the income is payable to the individual establishing the trust (the “grantor”) for life. However, the trust principal can’t be applied to benefit you or your spouse. When you pass away, the principal is passed to your heirs. This Medicaid Five Year Trust is helpful for Medicaid pre-planning because the funds in the trust are protected, and the income can be used for living expenses (as long as the trust is established and funded five years before nursing home Medicaid is needed). As far as Medicaid, the principal in the trusts isn’t counted as a resource, as long as the trustee can’t pay it to you or your spouse for either of your benefits. However, if you move to a nursing home, the trust income will be given to the nursing facility.

Testamentary Trusts

These are trusts created under a will. Medicaid rules provide a special “safe harbor” for testamentary trusts created by a deceased spouse for the benefit of a surviving spouse. The trust assets are treated as available to the Medicaid applicant only if the trustee has an obligation to pay for the applicant’s support. If the payments are solely at the trustee’s discretion, they’re deemed to be unavailable. Testamentary trusts can provide a worthwhile strategy for community spouses to leave funds for their surviving institutionalized spouse to be used to pay for services not covered by Medicaid (e.g., special equipment, legal fees, or transfers to another nursing home if that became necessary).

Supplemental Needs or Special Needs Trusts

Medicaid has exceptions for transfers for the sole benefit of disabled people under age 65. After moving to a nursing home, if a resident has a relative or friend who’s under 65 and disabled, the resident can transfer assets into a trust for the person’s benefit without impacting his or her Medicaid ineligibility. Preparing a Supplemental Needs or Special Needs Trust with the help of an experienced elder law attorney will keep the funds in them from being considered to belong to the beneficiary in determining their Medicaid eligibility. One downside to a SNT is that after the disabled individual dies, the state will seek reimbursement for any Medicaid funds spent on behalf of the disabled person.

I trust we have given you some idea of how Medicaid trusts could be a solution for you.

Contact Us
If you have questions about Florida Medicaid, Attorney Frazier is a skilled Medicaid planning (with over 2,000 cases completed that helped preserve their family’s savings), estate planning and elder law practitioner. Please contact Attorney Frazier for a free telephone consultation at 727-586-3306 extension 104. If you prefer click here now to send in a contact form and we will call you.

A Medicaid Primer Review For You

A Medicaid primer review for you to be able to make better decisions. Let’s review some of the basics of Medicaid coverage for those going into nursing homes or skilled nursing facilities.

Medicaid is our country’s second largest health program in terms of expenditures, only trailing Medicare, but it’s the largest in enrollment. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ 2016 actuarial report found that Medicaid insured 70 million people across the country in 2015.

Medicaid was enacted in 1965 by the same legislation that established Medicare. It’s an entitlement program that provides assistance to all individuals who meet the criteria for eligibility. The beneficiaries include the poor elderly and is a primary source of long-term care coverage in the U.S.

Medicaid is financed through a federal-state partnership, and each state coordinates its own program. The total federal and state Medicaid spending was roughly $532 billion in FY 2015.

 

Medicaid Primer Review: Who Is Eligible?

Those who qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) automatically qualify for Medicaid in Florida.

 

Nursing Facility Services: Who is  Eligible?

Medicaid provides nursing facility as a setting for care and services from Medicaid-certified nursing homes. These facilities provide three types of services:

  • skilled nursing or medical care and related services;
  • rehabilitation for injury, disability, or illness; and
  • long-term care.

The Medicaid-provided long-term care is health-related care and services that’s above the level of room and board and isn’t available in the community, but required regularly due to a mental or physical condition.

States can’t limit access to the nursing facility services or make it subject to waiting lists, as they can for HCBS (home and community-based services). HCBS provide opportunities for Medicaid beneficiaries to receive services in their own home or community instead of in institutions or other isolated settings.

The need for nursing facility services is defined by the State of Florida, which has created criteria for nursing facilities. State level of care requirements must provide access to individuals who meet the coverage criteria defined by federal law.

Contact Us

If you have questions about Florida Medicaid, Attorney Frazier is a skilled Medicaid planning (with over 2,000 cases completed that helped preserve their family’s savings), estate planning and elder law practitioner. Please contact Attorney Frazier for a free telephone consultation at 727-586-3306 extension 104. If you prefer click here now to send in a contact form and we will call you.

 

Medicaid Expansion in Florida

Medicaid Expansion in Florida has not happened and does not look likely to happen at this writing. Some states expanded their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare) to cover all people with household incomes below a certain level. Two years ago, the Florida Senate approved a Medicaid expansion plan, but it was rejected by Governor Rick Scott and the State House.

Regardless of state Medicaid expansion, to qualify for the Florida Medicaid benefit program, you must be:

• A resident of Florida;
• A U.S. national, citizen, permanent resident, or legal alien;
• In need of health care/insurance assistance;
• Whose financial situation would be characterized as low income or very low income; and
• Be age 65 or older.

Medicaid Expansion in Florida Costs The State Money

As of July 2017, Florida is one of 19 states that haven’t expanded Medicaid.

Families USA explained that Florida’s decision not to expand Medicaid means about 1.25 million Floridians don’t qualify for Medicaid, even though their incomes are under 138% of the poverty level.

According to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Urban Institute, Florida’s economy is negatively impacted by not Medicaid expansion in Florida. The state was projected to lose out on $66.1 billion in Medicaid funding (more than any other state) over the decade starting in 2014 because it isn’t expanding Medicaid. But that’s based on the assumption that the ACA (ObamaCare)—including Medicaid at the currently-scheduled federal funding level—would still be in in effect. Any new legislation implemented under President Trump may affect that program.

The Repeal of ObamaCare: What is the Cost to Florida

Florida stands to lose more than it gains under the proposed the American Health Care Act, which has a spending limit or per capita caps for each person enrolled in Medicaid beginning in 2019, with annual adjustments for medical inflation. Anything spent above the cap, the state would have to cover. With Florida’s spending for Medicaid at or near the bottom of all states, its spending cap will most likely to be lower than the national average.

In addition, the rate of Medicaid enrollment in Florida among disabled persons and low-income seniors, who are the most expensive populations to cover under the program, has increased more quickly than national averages over the past decade. From 2006 to 2015, Florida’s low-income elderly population, seniors who earn less than $24,000 a year for an individual or $32,000 a year for a two-person household, increased 25% compared to the national average of 14%. Plus, the rate of Floridians who qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) also has been higher than the rest of the nation by 35%. The national average is just 17% (SSI beneficiaries are automatically eligible for Medicaid).

Contact Us
If you have questions about Florida Medicaid, Attorney Frazier is a skilled Medicaid planning (with over 2,000 cases completed that helped preserve their family’s savings), estate planning and elder law practitioner. Please contact Attorney Frazier for a free telephone consultation at 727-586-3306 extension 104. If you prefer click here now to send in a contact form and we will call you.

Medicaid Planning For A Spouse: Essential Information You Need to Know

Medicaid planning for a spouse requires special attention. While the concept of spending down to become eligible for Medicaid is important to understand, with married couples, any spend-down efforts should be taken only after the unhealthy spouse moves to a nursing home where this would affect the “community” spouse’s resource allowance. (the community spouse is the one still living in the community, not at a nursing facility).

Medicaid has some special protections for the spouses of Medicaid applicants to ensure that the spouses have the minimum support needed to continue to live at home or outside of a nursing facility while their husband or wife is receiving long-term care benefits in a facility.

Spousal Protections in Medicaid Planning

If the Medicaid applicant is married, the countable assets of both the community spouse and the spouse living in the nursing facility are totaled as of the effective date of the Medicaid application. Sometimes this is referred to as the “snapshot” date because Medicaid is taking a picture of the couple’s assets as of this date.

To be eligible for Medicaid benefits, a nursing home resident may have no more than $2,000 in assets. Typically, the community spouse is entitled to retain half of the couple’s total “countable” assets up to a maximum of $120,900 in Florida. This Community Spouse Resource Allowance is the most that Florida will allow a community spouse to keep without a hearing or a court order.

As an illustration, if a couple had $100,000 in countable assets on the snapshot date, the community spouse could keep the entire amount, rather than just half.

Income of the Community Spouse

The community spouse’s income isn’t counted in determining the Medicaid applicant’s eligibility… just the income of the applicant. As a result, if the community spouse is still working, he or she won’t have to contribute to the cost of caring for her spouse in a nursing home if he’s covered by Medicaid.
However, in some states if the community spouse’s income exceeds a certain threshold, he or she must make a monetary contribution towards the cost of the institutionalized spouse’s care. The community spouse’s income isn’t considered in determining eligibility, but there’s a subsequent contribution requirement.

Contact Us
If you have questions about Florida Medicaid, Attorney Frazier is a skilled Medicaid planning (with over 2,000 cases completed that helped preserve their family’s savings), estate planning and elder law practitioner. Please contact Attorney Frazier for a free telephone consultation at 727-586-3306 extension 104. If you prefer click here now to send in a contact form and we will call you.