Aid and Attendance Facts

Aid and Attendance facts needed? You are at the right place. There are numerous VA benefits available to our veterans. The most common ones are education, home mortgages and health care benefits. One of the least known is the VA’s Aid and Attendance (A&A) benefit.

VSO (Veterans Service Organizations) may provide very minimal Aid and Attendance facts regarding the provisions of that disability pension since they are often focused on other major benefits the VA offers. Due to this lack of focus, information and communication along with the frustrations some veterans or surviving spouses experience when dealing with government bureaucracy may cause eligible individuals to not fully receive the benefits they earned and are entitled to receive.

If you are a veteran or you are a surviving spouse of someone who was in the military in a period of war (note: the veteran was discharged “other than dishonorable”; only needed to serve one day during the period of war – did not actually have to have seen action in the war or be in the war zone during this period of war – as well as include 90 days of active duty service and needs help with at least one activity of daily living) then you may be able to receive Aid & Attendance benefits.

We are not talking about someone with major disabilities. We are talking about someone who needs assistance with getting their meals, dressing, bathing, maybe taking their medications, etc. We are not talking about someone who is bedridden and needs major care and/or medical care. As a general rule, if you are 65 or older, that should be sufficient.

This benefit is, according to the VA, is one of the most under-utilized benefits. Most veterans are simply not aware of the benefits available to them under the A&A umbrella. They don’t know the Aid and Attendance facts. 

Many are intimidated by the application process and afraid to be refused. This is where an accredited VA attorney and Aid and Attendance lawyer can help.

More Aid and Attendance Facts: What are the Disability Requirements for Aid and Attendance?

Veterans, spouses of veterans or surviving spouses can be eligible for Aid and Attendance benefits if they meet the following disability requirements:

  • The aid of another person is needed in order to perform the activities of daily living and is 65 or older
  • The claimant is bedridden
  • The claimant is in a nursing home due to mental or physical incapacity
  • The claimant is blind

Veterans who entered active duty before September 8, 1980 (October 16, 1981 for officers):must have served at least 90 days of active military service, ONE day of which was during a period of war, AND the discharge must be “other than dishonorable”.

Veterans who entered active duty on or after September 8, 1980 (October 16, 1981 for officers):must have served at least 24 continuous months of active military service (or the period for which they were ordered to active duty if less than 24 months), ONE day of which was during a period of war, AND must NOT have been dishonorably discharged.

Most wartime veterans who satisfy these requirements will be eligible for the A&A Special Pension that provides up to:

Veteran Married to Veteran $2,903.00 per Month
Married Veteran $2,169.00 per Month
Single Veteran $1,830.00 per Month
Widowed Spouse $1,176.00 per Month

Note: These amounts apply only to 2018; benefits are adjusted each year based on increases in the cost of living.

Because of the A&A Special Pension, many veterans may be able to live out their lives in Medicaid or VA nursing homes. Instead, assisted living will be an affordable option.

If you want to learn if you or your loved one may qualify, contact accredited VA Attorney Frazier for a free telephone initial consultation at:

727-260-2581

After 5PM: 813-431-3193

A Case Study on Aid & Attendance

Case Study on Aid & Attendance a Veterans Benefits

Problem: Christian is a 72-year-old veteran of the U.S. Air Force, who served during the Vietnam War. Due to serious health problems, Christian now needs to live in an assisted living facility, which costs $3,500 per month. Christian meets all eligibility requirements for the VA Aid & Attendance program, but he only receives $2,000 per month in social security. Additionally, Christian has $20,000 in his checking account. Christian’s funds will not last long, because of the cost of the assisted living facility.

Case Study on Aid & Attendance Solution: Because of his military service, his medical condition, and his low asset level, Christian is eligible for VA Aid & Attendance. The maximum 2009 pension rate for Christian is $1,644 per month. The $3,700 monthly cost of the ALF effectively nullifies his income as an unreimbursed medical expense under the VA rules. Accordingly, Christian will receive an additional $1,644 per month from the VA.

Case Study on Aid & Attendance Result: Because of Christian’s eligibility for Aid & Attendance, the out of pocket expense for the ALF is now only $54 per month as calculated $2,000 x $1644 = $3554 – $3,500 = $44.

Veterans who served in the U.S. Armed Forces during specific periods of war–including wars in Afghanistan and Iraq–qualify for a little-known special care pension called Aid and Attendance (A&A). This pension is also available to widows and widowers of wartime veterans. Applying for the pension can be tricky, considering that so few care administrators nationwide are aware that A&A even exists.

This benefit provided by the Veteran’s Administration (VA) is the “Improved Pension Disability Pension with Aid and Attendance entitlement” is often called just the Aid and Attendance VA Benefit.

The VA Aid & Attendance program is designed to provide monetary assistance to those veterans who served our country during a time of war and are now in need of aid or assistance with activities of daily living. This aid or assistance can be provided at home, in an assisted living facility, or a nursing home and can be provided by friends, family, or healthcare professionals. As a practical matter, Aid & Attendance is often of most help to residents of Assisted Living Facilities.

If you are a veteran and need help with such daily activities as cooking, cleaning, dressing, driving, mobility, or other assistance, this benefit may provide the funds you need to pay for help.

Please contact Attorney Frazier who is an experienced Florida Aid and Attendance lawyer today for your free telephone initial consultation at:

Office: 727-260-2581

After 5PM: 813-431-3193

VA Benefits – A General Overview

This is an overview of VA benefits as a beginning for you sourced from the VA.  The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offers a wide range of benefits for our Nation’s veterans, service members, and their families.

Who Is Eligible for VA Benefits?

You may be eligible for VA benefits if you are:

  • A veteran
  • A veteran’s dependent
  • A surviving spouse, child or parent of a deceased veteran
  • An active duty military service member
  • A member of the Reserve or National Guard

VA Benefits and Services Available:

Compensation:

VA benifits can pay you monthly compensation if you are at least 10% disabled as a result of your military service.

Pension:

You can receive a monthly pension if you are a wartime veteran with limited income, and you are permanently and totally disabled or at least 65 years old.  There is no time limit to apply for Compensation and Pension benefits.

Health Care in VA benefits:

VA provides a number of healthcare services.

  • Hospital, outpatient medical, dental, pharmacy and prosthetic services
  • Domiciliary, nursing home, and community-based residential care
  • Sexual trauma counseling
  • Specialized health care for women veterans
  • Health and rehabilitation programs for homeless veterans
  • Readjustment counseling
  • Alcohol and drug dependency treatment
  • Medical evaluation for disorders associated with military service in the Gulf War, or exposure to Agent Orange, radiation, and other environmental hazards Combat Veterans – A provides free health care for veterans who served in a theater of combat operations after November 11, 1998, for any illness possibly related to their service in that theater.  Note: There are time limits for application.  You have five years from the date of your discharge from active duty on or after January 28, 2003. You have until January 27, 2011, if you were discharged from active duty before January 28, 2003, and were not enrolled as of January 28, 2008.

Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment:

VA provides assistance to veterans with service-connected disabilities to prepare for, obtain, and maintain suitable employment. For veterans with serious service-connected disabilities, VA also offers services to improve their ability to live as independently as possible. There are five service delivery options available:

  • Reemployment
  • Rapid Access to Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employment through Long Term Services, and
  • Independent Living

Assistance to veterans may be provided in the form of job search, vocational evaluation, career exploration, vocational training, educational training and supportive rehabilitation services.

There are time limits for application.  Generally, veterans have 12 years from the date VA informs them that they have at least a 10% rating for a service-connected disability.

Education & Training:

VA pays benefits to eligible veterans, reservists, and active duty service members while they are in an approved education or training program. Based on the type of military service, benefit programs are:

  • Active Duty Service: Persons who first entered active duty after June 30, 1985, are generally eligible under the Montgomery GI Bill (Chapter 30). Those who entered active duty for the first time after December 31, 1976, and before July 1, 1985, are generally eligible under the Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP).
  • Reserve/Guard Service: Benefits are available to Reserve and National Guard members under [a] the Montgomery GI Bill (Chapter 1606) who signed a six-year commitment with a reserve unit after June 30, 1985, and remain actively drilling and in good standing with their unit, and [b] the Reserve Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 1607) who were activated under Federal authority for a contingency operation and served 90 continuous days or more after September 11, 2001. Time Limits: Generally, veterans have 10 years from the date they were last released from active duty to use their education and training benefits, and Reserve and National Guard members have 14 years from the date they became eligible for the program unless they leave the Selected Reserves before completing their obligation.

Home Loans:

VA offers a number of home loan services to eligible veterans, some military personnel, and certain surviving spouses.

  • Guaranteed Loans: VA can guarantee part of a loan from a private lender to help you buy a home, a manufactured home, a lot for a manufactured home, or certain types of condominiums. VA also guarantees loans for building, repairing, and improving homes.
  • Refinancing Loans: If you have a VA mortgage, VA can help you refinance your loan at a lower interest rate. You may also refinance a non-VA loan.
  • Special Grants: Certain disabled veterans and military personnel can receive grants to adapt or acquire housing suitable for their needs.

There is no time limit for a VA home loan.

Life Insurance:

Service members’ Group Life Insurance (SGLI) is low-cost term life insurance for service members and reservists. Coverage of up to $400,000 begins when you enter the service. Generally, it expires 120 days after you leave the service.

Traumatic SGLI is automatically included in SGLI and provides for payment up to $100,000 for service members who lose limbs or incur other serious injuries.

Veterans Group Life Insurance (VGLI) is renewable term life insurance for veterans who want to convert their SGLI up to an amount not to exceed the coverage you had when you separated from service. You must apply within one year and 120 days from separation.

Service-Disabled Veterans Insurance, also called “RH” Insurance, is for service-connected veterans. Coverage is $10,000. You may be eligible for a $20,000 supplemental policy if you are totally disabled. You must apply for RH within two years of being rated service connected by VA.

Dependents & Survivors:

Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) is payable to certain survivors of:

  • Service members who died on active duty
  • Veterans who died from service-related disabilities
  • Certain veterans who were being paid 100% VA disability compensation at time of death.

Death Pension is payable to some surviving spouses and children of deceased wartime veterans. The benefit is based on financial need.

Parents’ DIC is payable to some surviving parents. The benefit is based on financial need.

VA Civilian Health and Medical Program (CHAMPVA) shares the cost of medical services for eligible dependents and survivors of certain veterans.

Dependents & Survivors Education & Training: Some family members of disabled or deceased veterans are eligible for education and training benefits.

Home Loans: Certain surviving spouses may be eligible for this benefit.

There are some time limits.  For education and training benefits, spouses and surviving spouses have 10 years from the date VA first finds them eligible, and surviving spouses of service members who died while on active duty have 20 years. Children are eligible from age 18 to 26. These time limits can sometimes be extended. There are no time limits to apply for the other benefits described above.

Burial:

VA offers certain benefits and services to honor our Nation’s deceased veterans.

  • Headstones and Markers: VA can furnish a monument to mark the grave of an eligible veteran.
  • Presidential Memorial Certificate (PMC): VA can provide a PMC for eligible recipients.
  • Burial Flag: VA can provide an American flag to drape an eligible veteran’s casket.
  • Reimbursement of Burial Expenses: Generally, VA can pay a burial allowance of $2,000 for veterans who die of service-related causes. For certain other veterans, VA can pay $300 for burial and funeral expenses and $300 for a burial plot.
  • Burial in a VA National Cemetery: Most veterans and some dependents can be buried in a VA national cemetery.

Time Limits: There is no time limit to claim reimbursement of burial expenses for a service-related death. In other cases, claims must be filed within two years of the veteran’s burial.

Benefits Information & Assistance:

For more details on VA Benefits click on this link now: httpss://www.benefits.va.gov/benefits/  

For more information about specific benefits with toll free phone numbers go to this link:  

httpss://iris.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1703

If you want to learn if you or your loved one may qualify for Aid & Attendance benefits, contact accredited VA Attorney Frazier for a free telephone initial consultation at:

                          727-260-2581

                          After 5PM: 813-431-3193

Why You Need A Florida Veterans Benefits Lawyer?

A Florida veterans benefits lawyer can be your best option. Not just any lawyer will do since you need an accredited VA attorney. You must get your “ducks in a row” from the very beginning or you could be dead in the water out of the gate.

A lawyer who is accredited by the VA is best able to create the argument, gather the evidence to support that argument, refute counter arguments and find expert doctors outside of the VA Doctors to give reports on your condition or even assist in getting military records corrected so the argument sticks.

A Florida veterans benefits lawyer who is accredited by the VA is best able to create the argument, gather the evidence to support that argument, refute counter arguments and find expert doctors outside of the VA Doctors to give reports on your condition or even assist in getting military records corrected so the argument sticks.

A lawyer who is accredited by the VA is best able to create the argument, gather the evidence to support that argument, refute counter arguments and find expert doctors outside of the VA Doctors to give reports on your condition or even assist in getting military records corrected so the argument sticks.

If your application is denied at the VA Regional Level you need to be ready at the Board of Veterans’ Appeals since any evidence you have missed and is not presented there may not be considered when you go to the next level of appeals at the Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims.

A second reason is only lawyers are licensed to take a veterans benefit case to court. Thirdly a lawyer is best qualified to do the review of records, research, counseling and other potential assistance that you might need prior to your actually filing the claim.

We could go on about why you would choose to use a Florida benefits lawyer; however, we think you get the idea. When we are talking about 10, 20, 30 years or more of compensation we could easily be talking about hundreds of thousands of dollars. Don’t you want the most qualified representation? This is likely to not be a time to be “penny wise and pound foolish” as the old saying goes. Call us now to discuss your concerns let us help you figure it out.

It all starts with your free telephone initial consultation with a Florida veterans benefits lawyer who is an accredited VA attorney.

During this interview, we will listen to your story, about the circumstances surrounding the situation, how you felt, how the injury or disability has affected you and your family, and what you have done to get the Florida veteran’s benefits that you deserve.

From there, we will help you decide what your next steps should be and formulate a plan for moving forward.

We will knock on doors for you, from the VA Regional Offices to the Veteran’s Appeals offices. If needed, we will go all the way to the US Court of Appeals for Veteran’s Claims and the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. You can count on us to do all we can to get disabled veteran’s benefits to compensate you for your injury or disability.

Remember, the first step to receiving your Florida veteran’s benefits is to call our office to schedule your free telephone initial consultation with accredited VA attorney John Frazier call us now at:

 

727-260-2581

After 5PM: 813-431-3193

Aid & Attendance Compensation You Can Expect

Aid & Attendance Compensation – A Good Chance You Can Qualify

You may be wondering if you or your spouse will qualify. To receive benefits the main general requirements are that you served a minimum of 90 days of active service in the US military, at least one of those days was during war time and finally that your discharge from the service was not a dishonorable discharge.

Aid & Attendance Compensation – The Level of Compensation You Can Expect

The following is a list of the 2018 maximum VA Aid & Attendance payments:

Veteran Married to Veteran $2,903.00 per Month

Married Veteran $2,169.00 per Month

Single Veteran $1,830.00 per Month

Surviving Spouse $1,176.00 per Month

It is important for you to know while there is no set asset limitation to be eligible however, generally speaking an applicant with assets in excess of $80,000 would not be eligible for this benefit. The asset limit would not include your home, automobile, personal property, funeral service contracts.

In order to receive the maximum monthly Aid & Attendance payments from the VA the veteran’s “unreimbursed medical expenses” must approximately equal or exceed the veteran’s monthly income. The cost of an assisted living facility is generally treated as an unreimbursed medical expense. Call us now to discuss your concerns about meeting the limits and let an accredited VA attorney help you figure it out.

How We Work For You To Get Your Aid & Attendance Compensation:

We begin our relationship by a detailed interview process where we listen to you. We learn about what happened to you and your current circumstances. We want to know about your physical, emotional and mental situation. Based on your experience and story we can determine if we can make a difference for you or not.

We develop a personal relationship with each veteran we serve and will run the gauntlet of red tape for you. We may even be able to help you get benefits if you have already been denied benefits as well as obtain retroactive payments for you for the time you were denied benefits. Helping military veterans and their spouses obtain the VA benefits they are entitled to is very personal to us as well as a sworn helping professional’s duty.

Call today for a free telephone consultation with Attorney Frazier. We will listen to you and let you know if we think we can make a difference for you given your unique situation and if you should engage a lawyer or not.

The first step to receiving help from an accredited VA attorney and getting on the way to your Florida veteran’s benefits is to call our office to schedule your free telephone initial consultation with Attorney Frazier at:

                    727-260-2581      

                    After 5PM: 813-431-3193      

Understanding Aid & Attendance Pension Benefits

We may be able to help you or your loved one qualify for Aid & Attendance Pension Benefits from the Veterans Administration if you reside in a Florida Assisted Living Facility.

The Aid & Attendance (A&A) program can provide money for assisted living health care expenses for qualified Florida veterans or their surviving spouses

This VA program has provided monthly payments to veterans and their spouses who have high out-of-pocket medical costs, and who are disabled or homebound, to help them offset health care expenses. A veteran or eligible spouse receiving a pension in assisted living or at home, who is also receiving Medicaid, can still receive the pension benefit in addition to Medicaid Benefits.

In addition to regular Military Pension benefits, if a veteran or surviving spouse of a veteran requires assistance due to a physical or mental infirmity, the VA can pay an additional benefit on top of a Military Pension.

For Aid & Attendance Pension Benefits, the activities of daily living which the veteran or surviving spouse of a veteran is unable to perform are considered in connection with the overall medical and physical condition. The criteria is defined as the applicant being in need of (scheduled and ongoing) aid and attendance from someone else. As a general rule, a person 65 years or older will meet that criteria.

What are Aid & Attendance Benefits?

  • Aid & Attendance (A&A) is a benefit paid in addition to monthly social security and other pensions. A veteran (or surviving spouse) may be eligible for A&A when:
  • The veteran requires the aid of another person in order to perform personal functions required in everyday living, such as bathing, feeding, dressing, attending to the wants of nature, adjusting prosthetic devices, or protecting himself/herself from the hazards of his/her daily environment, OR,
  • The veteran is bedridden, in that his/her disability or disabilities requires that he/she remain in bed apart from any prescribed course of convalescence or treatment, OR,
  • The veteran is a patient in a nursing home due to mental or physical incapacity, OR,
  • The veteran is blind, or so nearly blind as to have corrected visual acuity of 5/200 or less, in both eyes, or concentric contraction of the visual field to 5 degrees or less.
  • The veteran must also meet certain military service requirements and meet certain financial criteria.

Florida veteran’s benefits are designed to help the special men and women who put their lives on the line for our country.  

Obtaining Eligibility for VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefits can be very tricky so using an accredited VA attorney could make the difference for you.

I can help you navigate this complex process. As an accredited VA attorney I would be honored to serve you so do call me today at one of my numbers below even after 5PM:

                    727-260-2581

                    After 5PM: 813-431-3193

My team will schedule your free initial telephone consultation with me.   

Not ready yet?  Go to our blog post category on Veterans Benefits to learn more now.